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  • 6 Stretches To Do In The Morning If You Have Back Pain

    When it comes to dealing with back pain, there’s some good news and bad news. The good news is that, in many cases, regular back pain isn’t serious. The bad news? Even back pain that isn’t “serious” is still pretty painful to deal with on a day-to-day basis. experts share six stretches to do every morning if you’re dealing with back pain.

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  • People with back pain miss far fewer workdays when they receive recommended treatments

    Medical guidelines help doctors understand the best way to treat health conditions. Surprisingly, many doctors do not adhere to them, and this is a problem, according to a new study by scientists at University of Utah Health and MDGuidelines.

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  • Preventing Falls and Fractures

    According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 10 million people have osteoporosis, and almost 44 million more have low bone mass, which places them at risk for fractures. The good news is that it's not too late to protect yourself. Even if you already have thin bones or have already suffered a fracture, you can take the following steps to prevent future breaks.

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  • Mayo Clinic Minute: Scoliosis is not just for kids

    Scoliosis is a condition that causes the spine to curve. It's frequently diagnosed in children—often during the growth spurt just before puberty. But it can happen in adults.

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  • Why Is My Sciatica Not Going Away?

    Sciatica is a condition caused by an irritation, inflammation, pinching, or compression of your sciatic nerve. It can lead to moderate-to-severe pain and weakness in your lower back, buttocks, and legs. Sciatica typically heals in 4 to 6 weeksTrusted Source, but for some people, it can last longer.

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  • Most pediatric spinal fractures related to not wearing seatbelts

    Two thirds of all pediatric spinal fractures, especially in the adolescent population, occur in motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) where seatbelts are not utilized, reports a study in Spine.

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  • Putting fat to good use as stem cell source for spinal fusion surgery

    Adipose cells, better known as fat, may be the least popular component of the human body. However, most people don't realize that fat actually has many important functions in establishing and maintaining good health—providing energy, insulating the body against heat loss and protecting nerves, just to name a few. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine suggest there's another role for the poor maligned adipose cell: a practical and plentiful source of stem cells for use in spinal fusion surgeries.

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  • How to Tell if You Have Arthritis in Your Neck

    No matter where it occurs in the body, arthritis can be a real pain. One type, which goes by the name cervical spondylosis, can leave you with a stiff neck or major aches.

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  • Osteoporosis treatment before spinal fusion may lower risks of complications, revision

    Preoperative osteoporosis treatment lowered the risks of osteoporosis-related complications and revision surgery in patients undergoing spinal fusion of three levels or more at 1 year, according to published results.

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  • New proposal for the management of low back pain with a proprioceptive approach

    Low back pain in the elderly is the result of poor 'proprioception,' or the body's ability to perceive its own position in space, caused by a deterioration of sensory receptors in their muscles called proprioceptors. In a new study, researchers demonstrate a protocol for the management of low back pain by diagnosing and activating impaired proprioceptors with localized vibratory stimulations, crowning an approach that can enable elderly people to lead better lives.

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